N.S.A. Takes Step Toward Protecting World’s Computers, Not Just Hacking Them

Spread the love

WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has taken a significant step toward protecting the world’s computer systems, announcing Tuesday that it alerted Microsoft to a vulnerability in its Windows operating system rather than following the agency’s typical approach of keeping quiet and exploiting the flaw to develop cyberweapons.

The warning allowed Microsoft to develop a patch for the problem and gave the government an early start on fixing the vulnerability. In years past, the National Security Agency has collected all manner of computer vulnerabilities to gain access to digital networks to gather intelligence and generate hacking tools to use against American adversaries.

But that policy was heavily criticized in recent years when the agency lost control of some of those tools, which fell into the hands of cybercriminals and other malicious actors, including North Korean and Russian hackers.

By taking credit for spotting a critical vulnerability and leading the call to update computer systems, the National Security Agency appeared to adopt a shift in strategy and took on an unusually public role for one of the most secretive arms of the American government. The move shows the degree to which the agency was bruised by accusations that it caused hundreds of millions of dollars in preventable damage by allowing vulnerabilities to circulate.

“We wanted to take a new approach to sharing and also really work to build trust with the cybersecurity community,” Anne Neuberger, the agency’s cybersecurity director, told reporters.

The vulnerability exists in Windows 10, Microsoft’s flagship operating system, as well as some versions of its server software. It allows hackers to insert malicious code into a target computer and make it appear to be from a safe and trusted source. The vulnerability could also allow hackers to decrypt secret communications.

The vulnerability was serious, officials said. The National Security Agency warned government officials who oversee classified systems about the flaw and the coming Microsoft patch before discussing it publicly, Ms. Neuberger said.

The agency has in the past privately shared vulnerabilities it found with Microsoft and other technology companies. During the Obama administration, officials said, they shared about 90 percent of the flaws they discovered.

But the agency never allowed those firms to publicly identify the agency as the source of those discoveries, Ms. Neuberger said. The agency wanted the public acknowledgment of its role in finding the new defect to demonstrate the importance of patching the flaw, she said.

“Ensuring vulnerabilities can be mitigated is an absolute priority,” Ms. Neuberger said.

The National Security Agency’s action suggests the vulnerability for American government systems likely outweighed its usefulness as a tool for the agency to gather intelligence.

Experts and technology companies praised the agency. But some noted that even as one arm of the government was moving to protect the public’s ability to encrypt its communications, another was taking the opposite tack. A day earlier, the Justice Department called on Apple to break the encryption on its phones, and it has pushed for so-called back doors on Facebook’s encrypted message services.

The Washington Post earlier reported on the agency’s warning to Microsoft, which released a patch for the vulnerability on Tuesday.

Customers who automatically update their operating systems or applied Tuesday’s patch “are already protected,” said Jeff Jones, a senior director at Microsoft.

Microsoft said no evidence had emerged that malicious actors had exploited the vulnerability and said its security software could detect malware trying to do so.

The National Security Agency’s decision to reveal the flaw to Microsoft — and then to publicly announce its move — is in sharp contrast to how it handled another flaw that it discovered but told Microsoft about too late to prevent global damage.

In early 2017, agency officials told Microsoft’s president, Brad Smith, that it had found a flaw in its operating systems but lost it to a group called the Shadow Brokers, which somehow obtained hacking tools that the United States had used to spy on other countries. The agency had known about the flaw for some time but held onto it, believing that one day it might be useful for surveillance or the development of a cyberweapon.

But when the agency’s arsenal of flaws leaked out — presumably through insiders, though the National Security Agency has never said — among it was code nicknamed “Eternal Blue.” While Microsoft had raced to get people to patch the erroneous code, many systems remained unprotected.

Soon North Korean hackers used the code to develop “WannaCry,” software that crippled the British health care system, which used an outdated version of Microsoft Windows. And Russian hackers used it in the NotPetya attacks, among the most damaging cyberattacks in history, costing hundreds of million of dollars to companies including FedEx and Maersk, the shipping giant.

The agency dismissed the idea that it was responsible for the malicious use of the code — arguing that the responsibility lay with North Korea and Russia, which mounted the attacks. But privately, many agency officials acknowledged that the tendency to hoard such flaws in hopes of developing weapons had come at a huge price and that the United States bore some responsibility for the damage caused by Eternal Blue and other tools.

Some experts believe Eternal Blue is continuing to cause problems, allowing hackers to disrupt computer systems.

The White House often decides whether to hold on to a flaw for future use or reveal it to the manufacturer. Obama administration officials set up a system to make the decision. Trump administration officials say a similar process still exists, but they have stopped publishing information about the percentage of vulnerabilities they make public.

The National Security Council reviewed the latest decision to share information about the new flaw with Microsoft, Ms. Neuberger said.

The vulnerability involves Windows’ digital signature system, according to one of the people familiar with the issue. Microsoft, and other companies, use digital signatures to identify software and updates as authentic.

The vulnerability unearthed by the National Security Agency could potentially allow a hacker to add a fake signature that could allow malware to be inserted onto a vulnerable computer. Because the vulnerability was not yet public, no known malware has taken advantage of it.

Criminal hackers or nation states typically take weeks to exploit a new vulnerability, so businesses, governments and individuals may have a little time to install the security patch developed by Microsoft. Experts urged them to move quickly nonetheless.

It was not clear how much of a strategic shift the agency’s announcement amounted to. The agency presumably is still hunting for vulnerabilities and flaws that could allow them to infiltrate Iranian computer systems, as well as those used by Russia, China and other adversarial countries.

But if the agency continues to follow the example set Tuesday, future vulnerabilities that affect not just one critical computer system but instead millions of users or more across the world, its experts could help fix the problem rather than exploit it.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply